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Paid Family and Medical Leave Series
AEILet workers decide who counts as ‘family' for paid sick and family leave Beginning on October 1st, 2018, workers in Austin, Texas will have a new right: to paid leave for sick days, either for themselves or a close family member. Austin is the 31st city to adopt a paid sick leave policy — but the first in the South. (Nine states and two counties have also passed paid sick leave laws.) The new provision, City Code Chapter 4-19, will allow workers to claim one hour of sick leave for every 30 hours worked, up to an annual cap of 64 Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
AEI Resident Scholar Kenneth Pollack, who works on Middle Eastern political-military affairs, has just released the final essay of ” Pushback: Countering Iran in an evolving Middle East.” In the series, Pollack explains why the US needs a comprehensive strategy to stand up to Iran, and proposes specific policy prescriptions to limit Iran's influence in the region. Among his key points: 1) The US must adopt a more confrontational pushback strategy against Iran. Iran's leadership continues to treat the US as its enemy and is actively trying to reshape the Middle East in ways that threaten US interests in the region. 2) Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
On this AEI Events Podcast, researchers and college leaders met at AEI to discuss the connection between education and employment and how to improve the liberal arts degree. Podcast (aei-events-podcast): Download How can the liberal arts become more valuable for students and employers? How can community colleges and universities incorporate more skills-building opportunities into their programs? How can institutions fashion tighter connections between education and employment? Join AEI's Mark Schneider and Ryan Streeter, accompanied by expert panelists, to discuss the consequences of rising education costs, and how institutions can fashion tighter connections between education and employment. This event features opening remarks from AEI's Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Key Points Italy's forthcoming parliamentary elections must produce a government committed to solving the country's crippling economic problems via far-reaching reforms. Judging by Italy's poor economic performance since 2000, it would seem that adopting the euro as its currency in 1999 was a big mistake. However, leaving the euro at this stage would not seem to be a viable alternative for the country. Most economists would agree that Italy needs faster economic growth if it is to resolve its public debt and banking-sector problems in an orderly manner. With an appreciable risk that Italy could crash out of the euro, hopefully the elections produce Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEITrump's national security excuse for trade protectionism is almost as bad as the economic one National security is the justification President Trump will employ if he takes action against aluminum and steel imports. As the president said last week, “I want to keep prices down but I also want to make sure that we have a steel industry and an aluminium industry and we do need that for national defense. If we ever have a conflict we don't want to be buying steel [from] a country we are fighting.” Then presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech at Alumisourse, a metals recycling Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEITrump's national security excuse for trade protectionism is almost as bad as the economic one National security is the justification President Trump will employ if he takes action against aluminum and steel imports. As the president said last week, “I want to keep prices down but I also want to make sure that we have a steel industry and an aluminium industry and we do need that for national defense. If we ever have a conflict we don't want to be buying steel [from] a country we are fighting.” Then presidential candidate Donald Trump delivers a speech at Alumisourse, a metals recycling Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
Can Social Security be used to pay for a national family-leave program, at no cost to the taxpayer? Bloomberg View columnists Ramesh Ponnuru and Michael R. Strain discussed the idea in two recent columns, and reached different conclusions. Ponnuru said the proposal qualified as a real reform, since employees who took family leave would be agreeing to delay the start of their Social Security checks to make up the difference in cost. Strain replied that it was a bad precedent to make future claims on Social Security, even if the costs were pitched as revenue neutral. We asked them to discuss Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
The letter asks for answers by March 2. "If you do not provide timely answers on a voluntary basis, the committee will initiate compulsory p... at WashingtonExaminer.com Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Byron York Category: BYRON YORK
The Brookings Institution has released a new research report by Adam Looney and Constantine Yannelis looking at student borrowers with very high balances. The research provides a good reminder that borrowers with high balances, who often feature prominently in media coverage of student debt, are the exception. Just 14% of all federal student loan borrowers have balances above $50,000, and the majority of those individuals borrowed to pursue expensive graduate degrees. Despite their relative rarity, high-balance borrowers deserve our attention for the risk they pose to the federal government's finances. While high-balance borrowers represent just a small share of the individuals Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIDemocracy's dominance extends to the Winter Olympics The following graph, a follow up to my recent “Dictatorships and the Winter Olympics” post, plots out Freedom House's aggregate freedom score and Transparency International's corruption perception index for each country competing in the 2018 Winter Olympics. The number of athletes qualified for competition is represented by the circle around each country. The resulting picture speaks for itself. Democracy is great. Before we get to that, though, let's clear up the dichotomous distinction between dictatorship and democracy. There is a large and rich academic literature on dictatorship and democracy that is generally split into two camps. Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
The White House has reintroduced a paid parental leave proposal in the 2019 budget. President Trump proposed six weeks of paid parental leave run through state unemployment insurance systems. This is the same plan the White House proposed last year and is similar to the one floated during the 2016 campaign. But the plan has struggled to gain traction on the right, given its lack of a clear funding source and the potential for higher state payroll taxes to pay for it. A new proposal by Kristin Shapiro of the Independent Women's Forum and Andrew Biggs of the American Enterprise Institute Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Washington is abuzz over the recent release of new National Security and National Defense Strategies. Dry and wonky though they may be, these documents serve as crucial drivers and reference points for the nation's many national security efforts for the years to come. Both strategies share a common emphasis on the return to what is being called “great power competition.” In this competitive milieu, Russia and China top the list of countries whose behaviors threaten America's standing in the world. While referring to China and Russia as “great powers” is ultimately a gift to their propagandists, official recognition of Beijing and Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Key Points While many have begun to question whether the liberal arts have value for today's students facing an evolving economy, we show that, by adding additional skills to their a Bachelor of Arts degree, graduates can tap into 1.4 million entry-level job opportunities and significantly improve their employment prospects. This report identifies at least 10 high-earning occupations that can be open to liberal arts students and also the specific skills that can help unlock them. By developing these skills, liberal arts majors have the potential to improve their pay, potentially erasing the salary gap with STEM graduates. Students must explore new ways Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Pushback countering iran blog series
AEIPushing back on Iran, part 6: Pondering regime change The last aspect of a pushback strategy toward Iran that I want to delve into in a bit more depth is the role that regime change should play as part of that strategy. To give you my bottom line up front, I don't believe that regime change should be the primary goal of such a strategy or a direct aim of US policy at present, although I think the US needs to recognize a change in the regime in Iran is probably going to be necessary over the long term Read More >>
Tue, Feb 20, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
AEIThe global ‘educational-gender-equality paradox': the more gender equality in a country, the fewer women in STEM In a new research paper that was just published in the journal Psychological Science (“The Gender-Equality Paradox in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education“) by Gijsbert Stoet and David C. Geary, the chart above displays an international phenomenon that the two researchers call the educational-gender-equality paradox — the greater the degree of gender equality among 67 countries studied (vertical axis is the Global Gender Gap Index, a measure of gender equality), the lower the female share of STEM college graduates. The title of an article Read More >>
Mon, Feb 19, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
Within a decade, Germany must replace 85 of its Tornado multi-role combat aircraft. Designed and built in the 1970s by a consortium of British, Italian and West German aircraft companies, the Jets have reached a point of diminishing return when it comes to maintenance and modernization. In 2015, for example, it was reported by the German press that only 30 of the planes were combat-ready at any given time. Plain and simple, the Luftwaffe needs a new aircraft. Three F-35 Joint Strike Fighters (rear to front) AF-2, AF-3 and AF-4, can be seen flying over Edwards Air Force Read More >>
Mon, Feb 19, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIQuotation of the day on self-defeating tariffs and protectionism…. …. is from Allan Golombek writing in Real Clear Markets: There are only at most 150,000 Americans earning a living full-time in the steel industry, but more than 6 million work in industries that depend on steel, industries likes autos and construction that would be hurt badly by steel tariffs. ……….. The problem with tariffs on steel or any other product is that your own people pay them. Imposing them is cutting off your own nose to spite someone else's face. The bigger problem is that the people who actually pay the tariff, in the Read More >>
Mon, Feb 19, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
AEIYou might be a protectionist…. …. if you think it's OK to impose huge fines (tariffs/taxes) on your neighbors if they decide to travel on vacation to Canada, Mexico or Europe instead of traveling to one of the 50 US states for a vacation. …. if you think it's OK to impose huge fines (tariffs/taxes) on your neighbors if they decide to purchase wine produced in Italy, Germany, New Zealand or Argentina instead of wine produced in California. …. if you think it's OK to impose huge fines (tariffs/taxes) on your neighbors if they decide to watch an international movie instead of watching Read More >>
Sun, Feb 18, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER
AEIGreg Mankiw: The benefits of world trade are obvious. Any good student of Econ 101 can explain it to Trump From Greg Mankiw's op-ed in the New York Times “Why Economists Are Worried About International Trade“: When President Trump imposed tariffs on imported solar panels and washing machines, I was reminded of a line from George Orwell: “We have now sunk to a depth at which the restatement of the obvious is the first duty of intelligent men.” While Orwell's comment was focused on military and political issues, my subject is economics, and to most people in my field, the benefits of an Read More >>
Sun, Feb 18, 2018
Source: Public Policy Blog of the American Enterprise Institute Category: ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY CENTER