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“Medicare for all” and the Green New Deal may be bad ideas. But they aren't the worst ones being floated by the growing band of Democratic presidential hopefuls. That honor is reserved for the disastrous notion of expanding the Supreme Court. So far former Rep. Beto O'Rourke, Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sens. Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Elizabeth Warren have expressed a willingness to consider the idea. As Harris said: “everything is on the table” to address what she calls “a crisis of confidence in the Supreme Court.” For many Americans, however, the court isn't broken. Polls consistently place public confidence in Read More >>
Sat, Mar 23, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Who is the biggest threat to our constitutional order? It is not President Trump. Ever since Trump took office, Democrats have been telling us he is an authoritarian who threatens our system of government. Well, today it is Democrats who are declaring war on the Constitution. Leading Democrats are promising that, if elected in 2020, they will abolish the electoral college and might also pack the Supreme Court with liberal justices — allowing them to marginalize Americans who do not support their increasingly radical agenda and impose it on an unwilling nation. The purpose of the electoral college is to protect us Read More >>
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEI President Arthur Brooks discusses his book 'Love Your Enemies" on MSNBC's 'Live with Ali Velshi.' Read More >>
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEITrump's encouraging personnel pick on tech policy It's worrisome that when President Trump thinks about America's future of automotive autonomy, he pictures a sort of cars-gone-wild, “Christine” scenario. Axios reports Trump's take on driverless cars as follows: “I would never get in a self-driving car. Can you imagine, you're sitting in the backseat and all of a sudden this car is zigzagging around the corner and you can't stop the f—ing thing?” A fleet of Uber's Ford Fusion self driving cars are shown during a demonstration of self-driving automotive technology in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US September 13, 2016. Reuters/Aaron Josefczyk Autonomous cars are about Read More >>
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Philippines Foreign Secretary Teodoro Locsin Jr., left, accompanied by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, right, speaks at a news conference at the Philippines Department of Foreign Affairs Home Office
The United States-Philippines alliance has been under stress since the election of the vocally anti-American Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte in 2016, but Washington bears plenty of responsibility for the downturn in relations. Most frustrating for the Philippines was American inaction as China launched its march across the South China Sea earlier this decade, with the U.S. administration of President Barack Obama taking virtually no action to dissuade Beijing from its island-building campaign. When China reneged on a U.S.-brokered deal to end a standoff between Beijing and Manila over Scarborough Shoal in 2012, Washington did little more than shrug its shoulders. The U.S. has Read More >>
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
This week's decision from the European People's Party's political assembly to suspend Viktor Orban's Fidesz came a bit late was more timid than it needed to be. Without any doubt, however, it is a step in the right direction. Just to be clear, the EPP has not expelled Fidesz from its ranks. Instead, a statement said “the EPP Presidency and Fidesz jointly [agreed] that Fidesz suspends its membership”. That means that party representatives will not be allowed to attend EPP meetings, vote at those meetings, or nominate candidates for EPP posts. The restrictions will remain in place until the party-appointed Evaluation Read More >>
Fri, Mar 22, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Success in politics — and in political predictions — depends on the ability to distinguish between old rules of thumb that don't apply anymore and old rules of thumb that do. Take the old rule that an officeholder's chances of re-election depend on what James Carville in 1992 took to calling “the economy, stupid.” That used to be a real thing. The Great Depression took Herbert Hoover down from 58 percent of the vote in 1928 to 40 percent in 1932. The return of economic growth enabled Franklin Roosevelt to increase his 57 percent in 1932 to 61 percent in 1936 and Read More >>
Thu, Mar 21, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Patients in pain have become collateral damage in the war on opioids. That's the message of a letter from more than 300 medical professionals, including three former White House drug czars, to the Centers for Disease Control. In 2016, the CDC issued guidelines to discourage doctors from overprescribing opioids. The signatories believe that those guidelines are being misapplied in a way that keeps many patients in agony. Among policymakers, however, the focus is still on cracking down on prescriptions. Thirty-three states had imposed some type of limit on opioid prescriptions by last October. Democratic Senator Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and Republican Read More >>
Thu, Mar 21, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Over the past decade, the gay rights movement has had a lot to celebrate. Within a single generation, a politically divided country appeared to reach a consensus in support of same-sex marriage and acceptance of gay and lesbian people. Today, two-thirds of Americans support allowing gay and lesbian people to marry, nearly the mirror opposite of where things stood in 1996, the first year Gallup polled on the question. But the rapid rise in support and the corresponding changes in American culture have led to a growing disconnect between public perceptions and the actual experiences of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Read More >>
Thu, Mar 21, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
GB PM Theresa May gives a speech after surviving a vote of no confidence over the Brexit fiasco
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May makes a statement following winning a confidence vote, after Parliament rejected her Brexit deal, outside 10 Downing Street in London, Britain, January 16, 2019. Reuters When Theresa May took over as Prime Minister, she announced that “Brexit means Brexit.” However now the fate of her deal to leave the European Union is uncertain. With negotiations still ongoing, we interviewed AEI fellow Dalibor Rohac to break down what's happening and what it all means. On this episode, we discuss why the United Kingdom voted to leave the EU, the chances of May's deal passing and what it would Read More >>
Thu, Mar 21, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
A recent New York Times article highlights the remarkable outcomes of Pursuit, a tech workforce training nonprofit working with low income individuals in New York City. 85% of the program's 300 graduates ended up in a tech job within a year, and the average annual income for these individuals is around $85,000. This represents a more than 350% increase in earnings for program participants (up from an average of $18,000), nearly half of whom were on public assistance at the time of admission. Students participate in a creative workshop with Pursuit's lead instructor. Via Twitter/@JoinPursuit So what's the magic? The article highlights Read More >>
Wed, Mar 20, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEI5 questions for Neil Chilson on Big Tech and privacy regulation Has Big Tech become a barrier to innovation? Who owns the data you generate while surfing the web? And should you get paid when a company uses that data for targeted ads? On this episode, Neil Chilson discusses the economics of privacy, the complexities of content moderation, and whether Big Tech has become anticompetitive. Neil Chilson is a former Federal Trade Commission (FTC) acting Chief Technologist and a current senior research fellow for technology and innovation at the Charles Koch Institute. Prior to joining the FTC, Chilson practiced telecommunications law at Read More >>
Wed, Mar 20, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIDon't let terrorists ruin the internet As I post this, it's still incredibly easy to access video of the New Zealand terror attack. Only a bit of searching found it still available on Facebook, where the massacre was first live-streamed before going viral on other social media platforms such as Twitter and YouTube. The gunman wanted amplification, and he got it. It was even easier to find the shooter's rant, infused with white supremacy and deep familiarity with the online world and associated subcultures. A picture illustration shows a YouTube logo reflected in a person's eye June 18, 2014. Reuters/Dado Ruvic. Not that Read More >>
Fri, Mar 15, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIThe Microsoft Myth: We shouldn't assume more antitrust will give us more tech innovation Sen. Elizabeth Warren argues that if Washington breaks up Big Tech — and more aggressively reviews acquisitions going forward — the result will be more competition and thus more innovation than would occur otherwise. Just look at history. As the Democratic presidential candidate explains in a blog post: The government's antitrust case against Microsoft helped clear a path for Internet companies like Google and Facebook to emerge. The story demonstrates why promoting competition is so important: it allows new, groundbreaking companies to grow and thrive  —  which pushes Read More >>
Thu, Mar 14, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIWho's looking out for the consumer in the age of Big Tech? A long-read Q&A with Neil Chilson Has Big Tech become a barrier to innovation? Who owns the data you generate while surfing the web? And should you get paid when a company uses that data for targeted ads? On this episode, Neil Chilson discusses the economics of privacy, the complexities of content moderation, and whether Big Tech has become anticompetitive. Neil Chilson is a former Federal Trade Commission (FTC) acting Chief Technologist and a current senior research fellow for technology and innovation at the Charles Koch Institute. Prior to joining Read More >>
Thu, Mar 14, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIWages rising: The US economy is now working best for lower-wage workers It's good now and then to put away the punditry, toss the talking points, and look at the data. And though Trump's economic policies have been attacked for favoring the rich and corporations, they're hardly the only ones doing better over the past two years. A new Goldman Sachs report points out the following (bold by me): Wages have accelerated in recent months, and our wage tracker currently stands at a cycle-high pace of 3.4%. … Breaking down the wage acceleration by income level, we find that wage growth has Read More >>
Wed, Mar 13, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIElizabeth Warren's wrong-headed plan to break up Big Tech An encouraging result of Sen. Elizabeth Warren's mega-ambitious plan to break up Amazon, Alphabet-Google, and Facebook is her interview with The Washington Post tech reporter Cat Zakrzewski. At the end of the Q&A, Zakrzewski asked the Democratic 2020 contender, “How do you avoid unintended consequences on innovation if you break the companies up?” To which Warren replied, “I think what we have right now is the unintended consequence. The giants are destroying competition in one area after another.” USSenator Elizabeth Warren speaks about her policy ideas with Anand Giridharadas at the South by Read More >>
Mon, Mar 11, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEICan the Chinese Dream ever be realized? A long-read Q&A with George Magnus Will Made in China 2025 succeed in making China the world's leading producer of high value technology? Is China really a threat to the world's industrialized economies? On this episode, George Magnus discusses four “red flags” that may complicate China's plans for growth­. George Magnus is an associate at the China Centre at the Oxford University, a research associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, and a former chief economist for UBS. His latest book is “Red Flags: Why Xi's China is in Jeopardy.” You can download Read More >>
Mon, Mar 11, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS