For your convenience, Conservative Window publishes
articles from the top Conservative Thinkers online today.

If you have suggestions for new article feeds, please Contact Us.

Enjoy!

Abstract There is significant evidence that restrictions on residential land use reduce housing supply, increase house prices, and limit inflows of low‐income households. Local decision‐makers often argue that their efforts are merely attempts to preserve local amenities. We provide evidence that there is some truth to this claim: that residents of cities with more restrictions on land use appear to have access to higher‐quality and more‐diverse restaurants. In the process we develop measures of restaurant quality based on organically generated data that, while strongly correlated with expert assessments, are more easily calculated at high frequencies and levels of geographic granularity. Read the Read More >>
Fri, Jan 18, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has written President Trump to suggest that he postpone his State of the Union address, citing her “security concerns” over the ability of the Secret Service and Department of Homeland Security to protect government officials during the shutdown. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a press briefing on the 27th day of a partial government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, January 17, 2019. Reuters With all due respect, that is fake news. Pelosi isn't worried about security. She invited the president to deliver the State of the Union on Jan. 3, 13 days after the Read More >>
Fri, Jan 18, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIIs America worrying too much about China's rise? Recall the 2010 “Chinese Professor” television commercial from Citizens Against Government Waste. It depicted a futuristic Beijing classroom where students hear a triumphalist lecture on American decline. Despite (or maybe because of) its questionable economic substance, the ad really struck a nerve. (It currently has some 3 million YouTube views). At the time, writer James Fallows called it the “first spot from this campaign season you can imagine people actually remembering a decade from now.” And I think he was right about that, probably because “Chinese Professor” tapped into both pre-Trumpian concerns America Read More >>
Fri, Jan 18, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Key Points Although changes in American and Chinese leadership have brought current tensions between the two nations to the fore, the underlying reasons for the tensions are not tied to either President Donald Trump or President Xi Jinping coming into office. Rather, the strategic competition between the US and China is principally the product of regime-driven differences over both what constitutes their national interests and what their respective visions were for the character of China's rise. The administration's Indo-Pacific strategy is a relatively coherent response to the challenge China poses. But questions remain about the administration's ability to resource it sufficiently and carry Read More >>
Fri, Jan 18, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Darleen Opfer serves as director of RAND Education and Labor, a division of the nonprofit, nonpartisan RAND Corporation. She leads a 200-person staff that conducts research for major government agencies and private foundations. Along with her extensive work in the U.S., Darleen has researched teacher professional development in countries such as England and Turkey, and served as an education advisor in Norway, Israel, India, and South Africa. Before RAND, she was director of research and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge. I recently had the chance to chat with Darleen about the state of education research, and here's Read More >>
Fri, Jan 18, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEITaking another look at the trade-offs from raising top tax rates by a lot While some politicians think raising the top marginal tax rate to 70 percent comes with no downside, economists are less sure as the above UChicago survey shows. Some analytical color in the comment section offers further insights. This from UChicago's Austan Goolsbee, a former Obama White House economist: “Revenue, yes, but with lots of [deadweight loss].” And Stanford's Robert Hall: “I think it would raise more revenue but would reduce output.” Many economists who think wealthier Americans should pay more taxes wouldn't first turn to cranking up the Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has said it “absolutely” should be part of our conversation about the economy. During the presidential campaign, Sen. Bernie Sanders' chief economist was an adherent. But what the heck is Modern Monetary Theory? On this episode, economist and AEI scholar Stan Veuger breaks it all down, discussing his latest article for AEI Economic Perspectives titled Modern Monetary Theory and Policy. Podcast (political-economy-podcast): Download Stan Veuger is a resident scholar here at AEI where he specializes in political economy and public finance. You can download the episode by clicking the link above, and don't forget to subscribe to my podcast Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
♦
If you've ever been to a Donald Trump rally, you'll notice it doesn't match the impression left by the media coverage of the president's base. Anger, for instance, isn't the prevailing mood. Hopefulness is more characteristic. But there's more. There's something about these rallies that goes beyond politics, and his harshest critics have found it fearful. “Trump has harnessed the kind of emotional intensity from his base that is more typical of a religious revival meeting than a political rally,” liberal religion scholar Reza Aslan wrote, “complete with ritualized communal chants.” This isn't unprecedented. At Barack Obama's 2008 rallies, fans fainted, and Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIWorried about climate change? A ‘Green New Deal' isn't the only option Difficult to imagine high-profile advocacy is less likely to alter a debate than this: Four former Federal Reserve chairs are calling for a US carbon tax ASAP to address the risks of climate change. As the Financial Times described the effort: “Janet Yellen, Ben Bernanke, Alan Greenspan and Paul Volcker proposed an emissions tax that would be used to pay lump-sum cash rebates to US citizens.” And this from the statement, published in The Wall Street Journal: “The council proposes an initial levy of $40 per ton of emissions, Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
First, the (continuing) bad news regarding a proposed US-EU free trade agreement (FTA): As I have observed previously, the near-term prospects for a comprehensive bilateral trade pact are not good, despite compelling economic and geopolitical rationales for a common set of rules and obligations — not least in the face of the increasing impact of China's states capitalism model. Last week, EU Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström came to Washington for talks with US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. Once again, as has been the case for months, the talks ended with the two sides “still unable to agree on the scope Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
In this era when there has been more information available to more people than at any time in the past, it is also true that there has been more misinformation from more different sources than ever. We are not talking about differences of opinion or inadequate verification, but about... Read More >>
Thu, Jan 17, 2019
Source: Thomas Sowell Category: THOMAS SOWELL
 Almost a third of workers—and more senior executives—say their careers have been adversely affected by caregiving obligations. As Joe explains to this episode's guest host, HBS alum and Care.com CEO Sheila Marcelo, demographic trends and the changing role of women in the workforce mean that employers must “do the math” when it comes to care. By not accounting for costs like reduced productivity and increased turnover, employers leave money on the table when it comes to care. Link to our new report. This podcast was originally published by Harvard Business School. Read More >>
Wed, Jan 16, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
It is tempting for the Trump administration to dismiss U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit problems as those affecting a small and spent imperial power in a distant land with little relevance to the United States economy. However, that would be a grave mistake. Not only is the unfolding Brexit crisis casting a dark cloud over the world's fifth-largest economy; it is also occurring in the context of meaningful difficulties in Europe's other major economies. As such, a deepening in the Brexit crisis has the real potential to spill over from the United Kingdom to the rest of Europe and to Read More >>
Wed, Jan 16, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
In a recent blog, I noted that space limitations precluded adequate commentary on a recent Lawfare essay by Jack Goldsmith and Robert Williams which argued that the “name and shame” policy pursued by both the Obama and Trump administrations had failed to deter Chinese economic espionage and the pilfering of vast amounts of confidential data. What follows is a more extended set of comments. via Twenty20 In making their case for “failure,” Goldsmith and Williams recount the circumstances and details of a number of indictments since 2014, including the recent flurry of activity by the Department of Justice over the past Read More >>
Wed, Jan 16, 2019
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIWe shouldn't hand-wave away the economic risk from much higher tax rates Recent comments by new House member Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a New York Democrat, has reactivated or at least reenergized debate about whether top US tax rates are too low. And it's my sense that this debate comes at a time when many on the left seem to be suggesting that tax rates don't much matter, certainly not in the sense of promoting economic growth. That right-wing argument, according to this line of thinking, is just some scammy attempt to justify lower taxes for rich people who give money to conservatives Read More >>
Tue, Jan 15, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIWho lost China (again)?: A long-read Q&A with Zack Cooper As China continues to become economically and militarily dominant there is a tendency in Washington to act as though it all could have been prevented. But could China have been stopped? On this episode, China specialist and AEI fellow Zack Cooper walks us through how and why China failed to be incorporated into the international order as well as the futility of Trump's tariff regime in changing Chinese behavior today. Zack Cooper is a research fellow here at AEI, where he studies US defense strategy in Asia and US-China competition. What follows Read More >>
Mon, Jan 14, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEISome Galaxy Brain thinking on the government shutdown and its economic impact The easy — though not entirely wrong — analysis of the ongoing government shutdown is that it's a political event rather than a market or economic event. For Republicans and Democrats, the shutdown is the ultimate cage match with big potential electoral and policy implications. As The Washington Post characterizes the standoff: “[President Trump] has to win. His entire reputation, his entire relationship with the base, it's all a function of being committed on big things and not backing down. If he backs down on this, Pelosi will be Read More >>
Mon, Jan 14, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIRather than bemoaning globalization, we should be celebrating it Senator Marco Rubio makes an interesting point when he writes in The Atlantic: “For too long, government and business leaders alike have stood back and endorsed supposedly unstoppable global forces that have made life harder for working Americans.” The two “global forces” that pop into mind are technology and globalization. Now since much of the current debate about working-class woes has centered around globalization — both trade and immigration — let's focus on that. Globalization is certainly stoppable. The first “global century” of growing connectedness among the world's economies was stopped by World Read More >>
Fri, Jan 11, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEI5 questions for William Kerr on high-skill immigration and H-1B visa reform Nations compete across many dimensions, but in the coming years perhaps no competition will be as fierce or as important as the one for talent. My guest on this episode, Harvard Business School Professor William Kerr, explains why global talent has been so important and how the US might continue to compete for these talented few in his new book, “The Gift of Global Talent: How Migration Shapes Business, Economy, & Society.” William Kerr is Professor at Harvard Business School and Co-Director of the school's Managing the Future of Work Read More >>
Fri, Jan 11, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIHow the US can compete for global talent: A long-read Q&A with William Kerr Nations compete across many dimensions, but in the coming years perhaps no competition will be as fierce or as important as the one for talent. My guest on this episode, Harvard Business School Professor William Kerr, explains why global talent has been so important and how the US might continue to compete for these talented few in his new book, “The Gift of Global Talent: How Migration Shapes Business, Economy, & Society.” William Kerr is Professor at Harvard Business School and Co-Director of the school's Managing the Future Read More >>
Wed, Jan 09, 2019
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS