For your convenience, Conservative Window publishes
articles from the top Conservative Thinkers online today.

If you have suggestions for new article feeds, please Contact Us.

Enjoy!

“When you strike at a king you must kill him,” Ralph Waldo Emerson once said. Well, this year China tried to strike at President Trump for daring to launch a trade war with Beijing — and missed the mark entirely. After Trump imposed massive tariffs on Chinese goods earlier this year, Beijing responded in June with what appeared to be a clever strategy: targeting retaliatory tariffs against Trump voters in rural farming communities across the United States. China is the largest importer of U.S. soybeans, buying $14 billion of them in 2017. Three of the biggest soybean-producing states, Indiana, Missouri and Read More >>
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIA jobs report that reminds us of the power of economic growth The November jobs report produced plenty of decent news: the 3.7 percent jobless rate held at the lowest level since 1969, 3.1 percent year-over-year wage growth matched October's pace as the best since 2009, and even the lighter-than-forecasted 155,000 jobs gained means the rolling three-month average is still a solid 170,000. (On that last point, Barclays notes the jobs gain magnitude is about twice that needed to absorb growth in the labor force and push the unemployment rate lower over time.) Via Twenty20 But maybe the best news of all is Read More >>
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Marian Tupy of the Cato Institute has a great new paper out on the age of superabundance. It's a wonderful corrective to all the doom and gloom we hear from Washington most of the time. It revives the famous bet that economist Julian Simon won over doomsayer ecologist Paul Ehrlich toward the end of the last century. Ehrlich said the price of a basket of commodities would rise as population did, while Simon said the ultimate resource was human innovation and that prices would fall as we discovered new ways to provide those resources. Simon was totally and utterly correct. And Read More >>
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEI4 questions for Byron Reese on innovation, the future of the economy, and America's AI race with China Byron Reese, author of the new book “The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the Future of Humanity,” organizes human history so far by framing it around three main inventions. We entered the first age when we learned to harness fire and language, the second when we mastered agriculture, and the third came with the invention of writing and the wheel. Now we are on the verge of a fourth age, thanks to developments in artificial intelligence, and to hear Reese tell Read More >>
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Charles Best leads DonorsChoose.org, a nonprofit website on which teachers can post their specific classroom needs and receive crowdfunding. Starting in 1998, Charles spent five years teaching history in a high school in the Bronx. Noticing that limited classroom resources were available to his students was what moved him to launch DonorsChoose.org. To date, teachers at more than 80 percent of all the public schools in America have used DonorsChoose.org, and more than 3 million people have contributed. I recently talked with Charles about DonorsChoose.org and the role of philanthropy in education. Rick Hess: So Charles, what exactly is DonorsChoose.org? Charles Best: Read More >>
Fri, Dec 07, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Earlier this week, following a CIA briefing of US senators regarding the killing of Washington Post writer Jamal Khashoggi, Lindsay Graham commented that “there's not a smoking gun, there's a smoking saw.” As a former South Carolinian, I appreciate his Southern candor. However, word acrobatics aside, the revelation speaks to a truth that many Americans — especially millennials — have come to question: that democracies and autocracies are fundamentally different. Democratic government entails dysfunction and discord, but is fundamentally different from autocracies under the volatile rule of murderous Crown Princes, paranoid Politburo Chairmen, or thieving, former-KGB thugs. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci It is easy Read More >>
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
On this episode of the AEI Events Podcast, we travel back to 1991 with President George H.W. Bush as he discusses U.S. economic conditions, the fall of communism, the economy and the 1990 budget agreement. This event took place on December 3, 1991. Watch the full event here. Subscribe to the AEI Events Podcast on Apple Podcasts. Read More >>
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
As AEI's Brent Orrell explains, STEM degrees can only carry American workers so far if they lack soft skills like communication and empathy. Related reading:STEM without fruit: How noncognitive skills improve workforce outcomesAre we creating a STEM dead end? Read More >>
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEITrump's steel tariffs provide a great lesson for economics teachers everywhere A message for nationalist populist politicians: You may not have an interest in Mr. Market, but Mr. Market has an interest in you. Market forces don't vanish because of policy, although they may be rerouted and thus create unintended consequences. Trade protectionism has trade-offs. Economies are complicated things. A perfect example in today's Wall Street Journal: Reporters Bob Tita and Alistair MacDonald note that profits are up for US steelmakers since last March when their foreign competitors became subject to a stiff 25 percent tariff. An employee works next to steel Read More >>
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
Despite the recent drop in Silicon Valley stock prices, there is some good news beneath the surface of technology finance. In their most recent update, PitchBook and the National Venture Capital Association showed that US venture investments for the third quarter totaled nearly $28 billion. For the year, it looks like venture investments will top $100 billion, exceeding the previous record by more than $20 billion. Early stage investments have grown over the last two years, from a level of around $5 billion per quarter to a level closer to $9 billion per quarter. Investments in even younger companies — known Read More >>
Thu, Dec 06, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
Even before the “Gilet Jaune” (Yellow Vest) Movement started burning Paris, there were plenty of reasons to be critical of Emmanuel Macron's 18-month imperial styled presidency. However, before indulging in schadenfreude about Macron's current political tribulations, it is well to recall that he was likely France's last best hope for much needed market-based economic reform. Now that his political star has waned, not only does Macron's current diminished political authority at home cast a cloud over the French economic outlook. It also constitutes a major setback for the prospect of a much needed deepening of eurozone economic integration. This is especially the case Read More >>
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
The Trump administration has put competition with China at the center of its economic policy. At the same time, it has also advocated a loosely defined plan to expand economic linkages with the Asian Pacific region called “Free and Open Indo-Pacific.” The objective is to increase US involvement in the larger regional economy through investment, security, market access, and trade. For many observers, the Trump administration's current interest in engaging with the region is surprising, given the speed with which it withdrew from the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Moreover, some regional powers are likely doubtful of the sincerity with which the United Read More >>
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
There are a few movie scenes guaranteed to put a lump in my throat every time. Near the top of the list is the end of “Saving Private Ryan,” Steven Spielberg's World War II masterpiece. Earlier, in a climactic battle scene, a dying Captain Miller (Tom Hanks) tells Private Ryan (Matt Damon) to “earn this, earn it.” Translation: Live a life worthy of the sacrifice so many made for you. In the final scene, decades later, an elderly Ryan visits Miller's grave in Normandy, France, and tells the headstone that he's remembered Miller's plea every day since. “I hope that at least Read More >>
Wed, Dec 05, 2018
Source: Marc Thiessen Category: MARC THIESSEN
AEIAs the US economy keeps growing, real wages keep rising for everyone What happens when an economy keeps expanding year after year — even if industry is growing more concentrated and trade deficits stay big and unions aren't what they used to be? Well, this is what happens, via the Indeed Hiring Lab: More people returned to work in 2018. The unemployment rate fell from 4.1% in December 2017 to 3.7% in October 2018 — well below what the Federal Reserve thinks unemployment will be in the long run. A broader measure that includes labor force re-entrants — the ratio of employed Read More >>
Tue, Dec 04, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIAI and humanity's ‘fourth age': A long-read Q&A with technologist Byron Reese Byron Reese, author of the new book “The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the Future of Humanity,” organizes human history so far by framing it around three main inventions. We entered the first age when we learned to harness fire and language, the second when we mastered agriculture, and the third came with the invention of writing and the wheel. Now we are on the verge of a fourth age, thanks to developments in artificial intelligence, and to hear Reese tell it, this fourth age promises to Read More >>
Mon, Dec 03, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIIt's still unclear what the US-China trade war is really all about “Jaw, jaw is better than war, war” is one of those well known Winston Churchill quotes that Churchill apparently never said. (Or at least not exactly like that.) But it's still a pretty catchy phrase and not a bad first instinct. So from that perspective, perhaps, the results from the US-China trade negotiations in Buenos Aires are to be welcomed. Talks resulting in an agreement for more talks over the next three months is a pretty good alternative to a severe intensification in the ongoing trade conflict between the Read More >>
Mon, Dec 03, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIHere's why 3 percent economic growth is an ambitious objective for the US economy There are good reasons why so many economists who don't work in the Trump administration — such as those on Wall Street or in Washington at places like the CBO and Fed — are skeptical the US economy has been transformed from a Two Percent Economy into a Three Percent Economy. Here is the common economic framework for thinking about potential economic growth, as the economics team at Barclays bank explains it: This framework computes potential GDP growth as the sum of structural productivity growth and the rate Read More >>
Fri, Nov 30, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIThe profound strangeness of attacking the part of the US economy that's the best part of the US economy There's certainly evidence of rising corporate concentration in the American economy. And politicians and pundits across the political spectrum have noticed. Except you're not going to generate a whole lot of buzz by exposing the industrial laundry of hardware sectors. But Big Tech, now that generates headlines and sells books. Problem: The focus on concentration in the technology sector is awkward given the sector generates the sorts of economic results many policymakers say they desire. Really awkward, as the chart from a new Read More >>
Fri, Nov 30, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIWhen regulating dominant companies makes them more dominant: Big Tech edition Regulations often help strengthen the competitive positions of the companies being regulated. It's a classic unintended consequence. Now recall that the General Data Protection Regulation is the EU rule that some US activists have been pointing to as a model for what Congress might consider applying here in America to Big Tech. But how has it been working out in Europe, six months in? From Politico: Europe's sweeping new privacy rules are fueling an explosion in complaints by individuals, reports of data breaches by companies, and greater awareness among Europeans about Read More >>
Thu, Nov 29, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS
AEIAmerica needs more robots. But are we ready for them? If Americans want their living standards to rise, then the US economy and its workers must become more productive. And technology is obviously a big part of that. So it's a bit worrisome that a new analysis from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation finds that the US “lags significantly behind” many other economies when it comes to robot adoption — that, particularly when you consider the US is a high-wage nation and thus one would expect it to employ lots of robots. The research finds that out of 27 nations, Read More >>
Thu, Nov 29, 2018
Source: James Pethokoukis Category: JAMES PETHOKOUKIS